Friday, January 13, 2012

The Four Seasons

I'm not really a classical music junkie, but I must admit, I love listening to it. Usually, I'm into jazz and acoustics but having some twist in my playlist won't hurt. Besides, the anime La Corda 'dOro fired up my curiosity for some fine classics, and instrumentals - somehow - were my thing - and I guess that may pass up something at least semi-classical, especially the piano ones.

On how I got there:
And so, I was searching for some self-help articles on how to hone my focus (I'm having trouble with controlling my environment lately, getting me way too distracted to even finish one task. It's such a mess that it's taking up double the time I a lot to one task.), and I came across this particular article at Ratracetrap.com. This was entitled 8 Ways to Improve Your Focus and Control Your Attention by Stephen Mills. (Click the link if you want to read the article.) And at #5, Stephen mentioned about adjusting your simulation level. He said that playing music or sounds that relax you may help lower the simulation level and listening to upbeat music or videos may increase it. And of course, I go for the latter. So I tried the music he suggested would suit that kind of need. Classical, they turned out to be: Antonio Vivaldi's The Four Seasons.

Source: http://design.sva.edu/
"The Four Seasons (Italian: Le quattro stagioni) is a set of four violin concertos by Antonio Vivaldi. Composed in 1723, The Four Seasons is Vivaldi's best-known work, and is among the most popular pieces of Baroque music." (via Wiki) The four concertos were named after each season - being Spring, Summer, Autumn and Winter - each concerto, in three movements. These four concertos were written to accompany sonnets and allusions (which you can read HERE). I'm a fan of the subtlety and depth of poetry, and I can truly say they were beautifully made.


Probably talking gibberish again, but let me say it anyway:
I already heard one or two from this album, but I didn't know that they're such widely-known work by then. And it felt really good that I liked them, even before I even knew their backgrounds. Because you know, sometimes, title and acclaim affects a person's opinion in a thing.

At first, really, I was pretty unsure whether this would work out for me, but it turns out, it did. Listening to most classical pieces in the past leaves me a bit drowsy, but this is different. As Stephen implied, these were really stimulating. Listening to them makes me feel good, for some reason. And sometimes, it makes me feel sad. But 'nuff said, that goes to say, I love them. The pieces were smoothly performed, and relaxing to hear.I especially love the parts of the concerto in Allegro non molto movements (especially Summer's).

I listen to them first thing in the morning when I woke up to prepare for school. I listen to them whenever I'm reading my school books, or just chilling out and reading a good fiction book. I listen to them whenever I need want to block off the endless chatters and distractions in our pad. And I listened to them when I walk to school, early in the morning, while inhaling the sweet morning dew. Apparently, the whole album is on repeat - and they really bring good vibes to my being.

Spring, Summer, Autumn, Winter

How I obsessed over the whole Four Season idea. I'm a romantic, and I guess, romanticism involves the fantasy of a perfect transition of seasons - more like a metaphor for the transition in one's life.

I've found a Mediafire link, where you can download it if ever you became interested or just want to share my love for this album. To download, just CLICK HERE. They're converted to .rar file, so just extract it, and voila, you have there a beautifully made piece of gem. Music in the ears, indeed. :)

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Thanks for dropping by! I'd love to hear from you -- so don't think twice, just comment below and let's talk! If you're feeling like it, you could also link up and I'll make sure to visit your site if you have one. Much love, ~ R. :)

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