Saturday, March 9, 2013

That One Line #2

And we're back on this lovely meme again. Welcome to That One Line.
"That One Line is an online meme in which you'll feature a certain sentence or paragraph from a book you read which struck you or left a deep impression on you. According to Goldie: "It should be from a book although quotes related to reading are also welcome." 

I have so much things in my hands right now with the last wave of my pre-board exam on Tuesday (3 heavy subjects, my goodness!! >.<), but I just can't resist sharing this one line, or paragraph in this case.

As you can see (if you're in the habit of checking one's sidebar), I took a pledge to read a novel first before seeing the film whenever humanly possible. So I am currently reading Leo Tolstoy's Anna Karenina in my spare times and I can say that the book is deeply affecting -- at least for me. Surprisingly enough (others may bash me for this, but I don't care), I am really on Alexei Alexandrovich Karenin's side here (that is, Anna's husband). Anna and Vronsky just seem so selfish to me, so they really irks me off. But of course, I'm only in the earlier part of the novel so I can't say that my statement would stand still at the time I finish reading it. Ugh, useless book ramblings. >.<

In any case, here's my "One Line" this week:

"He tried not to look at her, but unconsciously his eyes were drawn to her. He examined that face again, trying not to read what was so plainly written on it, and against his own will, with horror read on it what he did not want to know."

Well, as much as I'd like to share a "sunny" quote for you today, this quote just resounded on me pretty badly that those motivational/inspiring line up can wait till next time.

This is from Karenin's POV. It was at that race scene where he is observing his wife as she fixed her eyes on Vronsky, her lover, alone. Something unexpected happened in the race and it was really evident in Anna's expression that she deeply cares for the man. She wasn't able to contain her emotions & worry, that she started crying. Karenin approached her and covered for her.

He was described as a fake and emotionless bureaucrat in Anna's mind, but it is really evident that in his POVs that he cared for Anna deeply. And when he said "I love you" and Anna was thinking "you don't even know what love is", ugh, I really hate her in that.

Aside from my feelings for the book, you can clearly see Karenin not wanting to admit the what was so obvious to him all along: that his wife loves someone else. 

How often do we let ourselves be blinded by our expectations, refusing to admit the truth that was so plainly presented to us? How often do we succumb in denial because we can't accept such sad realities? He knew it all along, but it never compared to the hurt of seeing it in his own eyes. Or in this case, hearing it, after, in her own lips.

Have you experienced something like that, too?

xxx

DISCLAIMER: The icon I use in my That One Line posts was grabbed from fellow bookworm blogger, Cora Mae.

4 comments:

  1. I'm guilty of this! :( Sometimes, it's so hard to admit to yourself that you love someone because you know he don't qualify your expectations and loving him is like betraying your own self. :(

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    1. aw... i know. anyways, it's such a beautiful line, don't you think? :)

      thanks for commenting, always, cora! :)

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  2. Oh my God. I am so loving your quote! Anna Karenina is on my TBR list, but I never really knew how beautiful the words in the book would be. I am so psyched to read this!

    And yeah... sigh :/ Sometimes we make fools of ourselves just 'cause we can't accept the truth in front of us... :(

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    1. yeah...do read it. though i admit there are a couple of "boring" pages if you know what I mean.. but it's okay when you get the hang of it. I just love it when the main characters are interacting with each other or just "in" the scene -- because as to what I've read so far, they're not (most of the time, I guess). but I think tolstoy really wanted to expose russian living during those times... but nonetheless (i cut my senseless ramblings here and just THANK YOU for your comment. :P)

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Thanks for dropping by! I'd love to hear from you -- so don't think twice, just comment below and let's talk! If you're feeling like it, you could also link up and I'll make sure to visit your site if you have one. Much love, ~ R. :)

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